A Bioenergetic Recipe for Healthy Eating

Good nutrition is obviously vital for sustaining health, preventing disease and maintaining a positive mental and emotional state, but it cannot be viewed solely in terms of its physical and chemical composition. Food and drink has energetic and informational aspects in addition to the physical; we must get not only the right biochemical components from our food, but also vital energy.

In the modern world, few grow and harvest their own food. Much of the food sold in supermarkets is chemically adulterated and nutritionally lacking compared with the foods of yesteryear, but at least we can make wiser choices to maximise the vital energy in our diet.

Living organisms – including us – are sustained by a vital force or ‘life force’ that cannot be explained in terms of traditional physics and chemistry. To eat and drink healthily, we must know:

  1. What vital energy comes with what foodstuffs? And
  2. What foods are appropriate for you, to provide the vital energy you need, taking account of your body type and lifestyle, etc.

Cooking Methods

The way food is prepared and cooked has a huge bearing on the vital energy it delivers to the body.

There’s nothing wrong with cooking – it is often necessary to make food digestible and destroy harmful enzymes. But we should aim to cook the same way as the body cooks:

  • Lightly sautéing and steaming.
  • No deep frying, which adds loads of fat and reduces the vital energy.
  • Avoid microwaving and refrigeration if possible; they appear to destroy vital energy.
  • If you eat out, look out for the healthier options. Fast foods have little vitality. Restaurant meals in general are prepared under pressure, and may lack vitality.

A Healthy Diet

There are only a handful of rules for a bio-energetically healthy diet. One of these is to choose food that not only contains beneficial macro- and micro-nutrients, but also contains substances (mostly enzymes) for the absorption of these nutrients and the elimination of waste. These substances are found primarily in fruit and vegetables. So:

  • Choose ‘living foods’ (fresh, raw fruit and vegetables, juices etc.) rather than ‘dead’ foods (almost everything else) as much as possible.
  • Choose organic food whenever possible, preferably grown locally and freshly harvested. Growing your own food increases its vital energy.
  • Meat should be raised naturally, grazing in the open air, to avoid the phenomenon of ‘angry meat’ which comes from stressed/unhappy animals.
  • Drink plenty of fluids. Many people are functionally dehydrated. Individuals need to ingest healthy fluids equal to their body weight in kilograms divided by 30, in litres. Hence a 75 Kg person needs 2.5 litres of water, fruit juice, herbal or fruit tea etc. per day.
  • Sprouting beans multiplies the nutritional value several fold and is especially good for vegetarians.
  • Consider not only the health impact of one’s nourishment system, but also their environmental and social effects.
  • Make the largest component of your diet fresh vegetables with fruit. Choose fruit and vegetables of different colours; the secondary phytonutrients responsible for the colour are mostly highly effective antioxidants or contribute to lowering blood pressure and reducing the risk of disease.
  • Omnivores should choose the lighter sources of protein like fish and lean lamb, chicken and turkey.
  • Vegetarians should make sure they get sufficient high quality protein by including beans, lentils, quinoa and other sources in their diets.
  • Reduce saturated fatty acids. This should be a priority. Replace them with Omega 3, 6 and 9 alternatives such as in avocados, nut butter and seed oils.
  • Sugar addicts should reduce their consumption to an occasional ‘treat’ and replace sweets with fresh fruit and yogurts.
  • Avoid chemically preserved foods and foods with artificial additives (colourings, emulsifiers, sweeteners etc.) as much as possible.
  • Maximise your intake of antioxidants. Antioxidants are molecules used by the body to stop damage to the cells by free radical molecules[1]. Deep green vegetables, broccoli, red grapes, tomatoes, whole grains, all kinds of berries (especially blueberries), tea, seeds and sweet potatoes all contain high levels of antioxidants.
  • Don’t depend too much on supplements. Supplements are energetically lacking since vital energy comes from the whole food, not just a part. For example, you can take the vitamin C out of an orange, but all the other energetic components are lacking.
  • Prepare food with a harmonious, relaxed attitude. Eat slowly, bless your food and take your time!

Juicing

Juicing deserves special mention because it can have a very positive effect on health. Just one pint of juice a day can have a wondrous effect. Juicing offers up to five times the amount of enzymes, antioxidants and phytonutrients in ten minutes than you would have during a normal day of eating, without five times the calories. They can also speed up recovery from illness.

  • Juice large amounts of greens, like lettuce, watercress and spinach.
  • Fruit, beetroots and carrots generally have too much sugar, so only use them in smaller quantities (no more than ¼ to ½ the total juice content). Choose green apples rather than the sweeter varieties.
  • Give your body a wide variety of everything the earth has to offer. You have plenty to choose from – kiwi fruit, celery, carrots, parsley, watermelon and so on.

Elimination

It is important to keep the bowels clean. Waste products become toxic after a while, so keep to a routine and move the bowels regularly. A healthy diet (plenty of salads, fibre, wholegrain) assists this process.

Enjoy your food

Think about what you’re actually eating and drinking. The idea that we can pop a vitamin pill to make up for all our bad eating habits is a fallacy, so correct what you’re eating before spending lots of money on nutritional products.

Create your own form of individual nutrition, based, of course, on a sound basic knowledge of the physical, chemical, energetic and informational properties of nutrients.

If you’re not sure what you’re eating, keep a nutrition diary for seven days. At the end of the week, ask yourself what proportion of your intake is accounted for by fats, carbohydrates and proteins? What proportion is fresh fruit and vegetables? Confectionery? Wholegrains? Anti-oxidant rich foods? Etc?

And relax! You don’t need to give up all your favourite foods or make eating a chore!

© David Lawrence Preston, 18.5.2019

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[1] Free radicals are reactive molecules in the body that damage cells and contribute to disease and the effects of ageing.

A Bioenergetic View of Nutrition

Nutrition is one of the most important topics for maintaining good health, preventing disease and maintaining a positive mental and emotional state. But few conventional doctors are trained beyond the basics in nutrition and most understate its importance. My doctor told me less than a day of his seven years’ at medical school was devoted to the subject!

Conventional Western medicine looks at nutrition largely in terms of its physical and chemical composition. It takes account, for instance, of the metabolism of macro-nutrients (carbohydrates, proteins and fats) and micro-nutrients like vitamins and trace minerals. But the Science of Bio-energetics takes a broader perspective. It recognises that food and drink has energetic and informational aspects too, and that people must get not only the right biochemical elements from their food, but also vital energy.

Nutrition must be considered not only from a biological and chemical point of view, but also as a provider of energy such as light and information.

Nutrition from a Biological and Chemical Perspective

Conventional medicine considers food in three main groups – proteins, fats and carbohydrates – plus vitamins, essential minerals and so on.

Carbohydrates are made of sugars and starch. But simple sugars provide only ‘empty’ calories. They have high calorific value but do not contain any vitamins or minerals. Starch is made up of more complex sugars and provides the main energy reservoir of grains, roots, bulbs and seeds.

Fats are energy providers; they have twice the biological calorific value of carbohydrates or proteins and store huge amounts of energy. If there is a deficiency of carbohydrates, fats and proteins are converted into energy. Vegetable fats are primarily composed of mono- and poly-saturated fatty acids. Animal fats are primarily made of unsaturated fatty acids and have a more solid form. Fats (fat pads) pads protect organs from injuries and serve as temperature insulation; they facilitate the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins; and are flavour carriers for fat-soluble flavours and aromas.

Proteins are made of amino acids. There are essential and non-essential amino acids. The essential ones cannot be synthesised by the body and must be supplied through food. Unlike carbohydrates and fats, proteins cannot be stored in the body and must be provided on a daily basis. Their best-known function is to build up muscles, but they also serve to store certain minerals, maintain the body’s shape, regulate enzymes and hormones, maintain immune defence and transmit nerve impulses.

Vitamins are crucial to body function and support the healing process, but cannot be synthesised by the body. There are fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K ) and water-soluble vitamins (the rest). Fat-soluble vitamins can only be taken up with fat, which means that we can gulp down lots of fat-soluble vitamins but without fat they cannot be absorbed.

Essential minerals include calcium, potassium and magnesium and trace minerals such as copper, iron, zinc, selenium and iron.

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Bioenergetic Nutrition

Subtle energies play a significant role in nutrition. Every cell has innate intelligence so the body knows instinctively what is good for it and what is not. It recognises and welcomes healthy sources of nutrition that meet its needs.

The body also knows what is not healthy and tries to eliminate it, sometimes drastically (i.e. sickness or diarrhoea). Unfortunately many people bombard their digestive systems unhealthy nutrition – sugary drinks, excessive fat, food that has had the goodness processed out of it or is cooked to extinction – until the body is overwhelmed and at the last resort packs up altogether.

Living organisms are sustained by a vital force or ‘life force’ that cannot be explained in terms of traditional physics and chemistry. It (or its lack) is responsible for much that happens in health and disease.

To eat and drink healthily, you must know:

  1. What vital energy comes with what foodstuffs?
  2. Bearing in mind that people are different, what foods are appropriate for you, to provide the vital energy you need? How do you take account of your body type and lifestyle, etc.?

A significant part of your energy comes from food, but food is more than just a source of thermal or chemical energy – because the magnetic, gravitational and light energy of your nutrients are the basis of all of the building and repairing molecules that become your body.

Individual differences

The ancient healers were aware of the need to take account of different body types. For example, the Chinese identified yin (cold) and yang (hot) types. Hot body types need cold food (e.g. vegetables and salads) and cold body types hot food (e.g. meat, onions and spices).

Ayurveda works with three elemental energies or humors: vata (air & space – ‘wind‘), pitta (fire & water – ‘bile‘) and kapha (water & earth – ’phlegm‘). When these three are in balance, the body is healthy; if not, it is diseased. Everyone has a unique combination of vata, pita and kapha. One ingenious way of assuring a balanced diet in Ayurvedic Medicine is to include some of each of the six tastes – salt, sweet, astringent, bitter, pungent and sour – in the diet every day.

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Biophotons in Food

Recent discoveries about the bio-photons that radiate light from the cells of plants and animals reveal a great deal about the health of the body and the food we eat.

In the 1970s, Dr Fritz-Albert Popp showed that living systems depend on light. They exist inside a coherent photon field, and biophotons are responsible for cellular communication and regulating biological functions. He later developed a device to detect biophotons from plant and animal cells which is now being used to determine the quality of food.

Popp also found that healthy people emit light rhythmically and in a balanced way. For example, cancer patients lack these rhythms; multiple sclerosis sufferers exhibit too much light. He concluded that health was a delicate balance between chaos and order. Too much coherence causes the system to collapse. (Consider an army which staggers its steps when marching across a bridge. If all footsteps fell at the same time, the bridge could collapse.)

Some conclusions

Nutrition is crucial in health and healing. It’s also a popular subject in the media – they give out loads of healthy eating messages, many of which are confusing and contradictory.  Healthy eating is big business – large companies promote a variety of eating regimes which achieve mass popularity, only to be discarded when the next fad comes along.

Doctors advocate a ‘balanced diet’ in general, but don’t always give nutrition the attention it deserves, nor grasp the differences between individual patients from a nutritional point of view. Holistic healers have known for centuries that nutrition is important. Dietary therapy is a vital plank of Traditional Chinese Medicine, and the Ayurvedic practitioners of India developed a sophisticated approach based on individual body types and the characteristics and tastes of foods.

Mainstream science has a problem with ‘vital energy’ because it can’t be seen, smelt, heard or tasted. Hence it is often ignored. But the best bio-energetic practitioners understand what vital energy comes with which foodstuffs, and how it can be best preserved though the storage and cooking process.

In general, the fresher and more natural the food, the fewer additives and the less processing, transporting, storage and cooking, the higher its bio-energetic value. This is what we should all be aiming for.

©David Lawrence Preston, 15.1.2019

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Building Self-Confidence in Practice

In-I-T-I-A-te change!

When you apply the I-T-I-A Formula – Self-awareness +Intention +Thinking +Imagination +Action – to confidence building, the shift in consciousness is not necessarily dramatic, more like a gradual awakening. Over time, you cast off your negative conditioning and adopt more empowering beliefs. Then feelings and actions change too.

It’s like climbing a ladder; don’t try too much at once, take it one rung at a time. Small steps are important. Every day, stretch yourself a little further; have a go at something which you would previously have found too daunting, like striking up a conversation with a stranger, asserting yourself, or giving a talk to a local group.

Each time you succeed, you gain encouragement, your attitude changes, and before long it will get easier and you’ll feel better than ever before.

One of the secrets of confidence building is to act ‘as if’ you’re growing in confidence, and ‘as if’ you are the person you want to be. This is what William Shakespeare meant when he wrote, ‘Assume a virtue if you have it not’.

Project an air of quiet confidence, even if you don’t feel it. For instance, if you feel shy in the company of people you don’t know, shake hands firmly, look them in the eye, speak with a confident tone of voice, and smile. It may feel like a big effort at first, but even if you have butterflies in your stomach, act as if you’re confident and you will feel more confident. Eventually the uncomfortable feelings fade.

Many outwardly confident people had to work at it, knowing that if you act confidently and look as if you know what you’re doing, then sooner or later you will feel that way.

If it feels uncomfortable to begin with, remember that it’s only your programming and conditioning trying to keep you to old habits.

It’s important to keep in mind what you’re striving for – reinventing yourself as a calm and  confident person with high self-esteem and a healthy and secure self-image.

Mental rehearsal

Creative imagery is a great ally when building confidence. Mentally rehearse any impending challenge, creating the perfect result in your mind every time to impress this on your subconscious. ‘See’, ‘hear’ and ‘feel’ yourself as a confident and successful person.

Here’s a useful four-stage routine for building confidence. Let’s say you have some goal in mind, such as making a sale, attracting a member of the opposite sex, passing an exam or attending a job interview:

  1. ‘Visualise’ yourself as a confident person and imagine what it would feel like to be loaded with confidence.
  1. Next,’ visualise’ yourself behaving confidently, for instance delivering the talk with assurance, interacting with others confidently and handling difficult questions with ease.
  1. ‘Visualise’ yourself having accomplished your objective.
  1. Finally, ‘visualise’ others’ response to your success, e.g. applauding, congratulating you etc.

Remember also to use the modelling, and anchoring techniques to the full.

Celebrate your progress!

Every time you take a step forward, reward yourself. Buy yourself a small treat, take a weekend break, go on a course – something that will give you a further taste of pleasure and success.

If on the other hand things don’t work out as you planned, don’t chastise yourself. Reflect on what you can learn from it and put the episode down to experience.

Focus on the positives

Every moment, think of all the good qualities you have. Don’t get caught up in what others think of you – or, more correctly, what you imagine others may think of you (because we can never know for sure what another person is thinking). Otherwise you’ll only attract people who demand you to keep them happy.

Instead, keep yourself happy! Be the kind of person you want to be and you’ll attract others who are the same. Remember, like attracts like. The rest follows automatically.

Be patient

If you really believed in yourself, how would you feel? Then isn’t it worth spending a little time each day working on yourself, building your self-belief? Of course it is. With a good self-image, confidence, a clear purpose and a realistic action plan almost anything is possible.

But you’ll have to be patient. Rome wasn’t built in a day, and, if your confidence is currently low, neither is self-belief. So start now, wherever you are at, and never, never give up. It’s open to everyone!

©David Lawrence Preston, 25.8.2018

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The Secrets of Healing

The secrets of healing have long been known but it’s taken science a long time to catch up.

There’s an old story about a group of eminent scientists climbing the mountain of knowledge. They scramble up to the top of a steep slope, only to see an even higher peak in the distance. They climb the next peak, only to see yet another beyond that. They climb that and….. guess what? There’s yet another. Finally, exhausted, they pull themselves over the final rock, only to be greeted by a group of healers and metaphysicians who had been sitting there for centuries!

This analogy was not lost on Einstein. ‘Creating a new theory is not like destroying an old barn and erecting a skyscraper in its place,’ he wrote. ‘It is rather like climbing a mountain, gaining new and wider views, discovering unexpected connections between our starting points and its rich environment. But the point from which we started out still exists and can be seen, although it appears smaller and forms a tiny part of our broad view gained by the mastery of the obstacles on our adventurous way up.’

Every year, while most scientists continue to circle the base of the mountain, some climb a little higher. Enormous advances have been made in the last couple of decades, some of which has yet to reach the general public.

Healing and Consciousness

The healing methods applied in societies throughout history have always been closely related to the consciousness of those societies and its individuals. They have depended on how they saw the nature of the human body and its relationship with the environment in which we live. At some point in history, humans woke up to the fact that they could do something to heal themselves when they were injured or ill, and not merely alleviate discomfort. Previously, like the animals, they would have crawled into a cave or clearing and waited until they felt better before leaving it – or died.

Then at some stage those early humans realised that even death could be postponed by applying certain healing methods. They discovered that certain plants could help and that healing ceremonies and rituals could speed up the process. The earliest healers were shamans; evidence of shamanic healing goes back over fifty thousand years. Shamans studied the relationship between humans and their natural environment. They tried to harness the laws of nature to initiate health and bring about healing.

Around two and a half thousand years ago, healing became more scientific. The Greeks, worshippers of the healthy body and surely one of the most progressive and cultured of all ancient societies, began using a more systematic approach based on observation and reason. They used animal and human dissections to improve their understanding of how the body functions. By New Testament times, Greek doctors already had a good idea of the functions of the main organs and had mapped the circulatory system.

As early Christendom sank into a deep mistrust and contempt for the physical body, the next great era of anatomical research in the West took place when Muslim doctors added to earlier knowledge and explained the workings of the muscles and digestive system. I say ‘in the West’ because on the other side of the world, the Chinese were already far ahead in their healing techniques.

In the Middle Ages and beyond, Western medicine remained largely in the grip of the Greek physician often referred to as the ‘Father of Medicine’, Hippocrates, and his followers. This led to some strange practices. Hippocrates believed that there were four types of fluid in the body, which needed to be in perfect balance if health were to be maintained. So, for example, if you had a fever, you had too much blood and would be subject to leeches and other purging methods to reduce blood levels. The patient would often be so weak afterwards it would take weeks to recover. Bizarre? Yes, but won’t some of our 21st Century medical practices seem equally bizarre in the future?

In the past three hundred years, great strides have been made in the medical field – yet almost every great pioneer in most fields of medicine was ridiculed by the ‘experts’ of their day. Some of the great pioneers were accused of ‘humbug!’ and called ‘quacks’ by their contemporaries.

Today, in the early years of the 21st Century, global medicine is in the group of one particular school of thought, a view of the body perpetrated by those who see humans mainly as thinking machines ruled by our biochemistry. I say ‘global’ because even societies, like China and India, with rich healing traditions of their own, are succumbing to the power of the pharmaceutical mega-businesses that straddle the planet. But the medical/pharmaceutical establishment will one day give way as a new holistic paradigm is rising. They are so worried that they spend huge sums specifically to discredit holistic medicine, discouraging the public from ‘wasting’ their hard-earned money on ‘unproven’ healing systems and techniques. Anything outside the realms of chemicalised, mechanized, industrialised medicine is roundly condemned.

Medical history is like a parade of innovators who were far ahead of their time and dismissed as cranks in their day. Some lived long ago; some are still alive today. To appreciate them requires the willingness to critically all our beliefs about healing. We must forget what we’ve been told about what can be healed, what can’t be healed, who can heal, who can’t heal and how healing takes place.

The healing methods employed in any society say a great deal about its beliefs about what humans are and how we relate to the universe. All too often we go round in circles as we head up the mountain of knowledge. As T.S. Elliot pointed out:

‘We shall not cease from exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time.’

©David Lawrence Preston, 4.5.2019

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The Best Exercise

Among all the hype for expensive gyms, personal trainers and trendy keep fit programmes, it’s easy to forget that the very best exercise costs almost nothing and is available to almost everyone.

According to research by the LSE, people who regularly walk at a brisk pace for more than 30 minutes at a time are slimmer and fitter than those preferring gym workouts, swimming or cycling. Previous studies had also shown that walking can be effective at warding off disease, lowering cholesterol, reducing blood pressure and countering stress, anxiety and depression.

To get the full benefits, you need to walk for 30 minutes, five times a week, at a pace that makes you slightly breathless and lightly perspiring. Try to walk around 10,000 steps per day – most people walk only 3,000-4,000 steps. Start the walk slowly, speed up, then ease off as you get towards the end. A few gentle stretches before and after to warm up and cool down are also beneficial.

10,000 steps may seem a lot, but simply leaving the car at home and walking instead of catching the bus for short distances can help enormously, as can using the stairs instead of a lift or escalator. However, nothing beats walking in the country at weekend, a stroll in the park or (if you’re lucky enough to live by the sea as I do) a walk on a beach.

And after all – it’s what your body was designed to do!

©David Lawrence Preston, 6.1.18

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Tap it or bottle it?

People have asked for my opinion on the advantages of bottled versus tap water. Here goes:

When you drink pure, fresh water, the body loves it. You can almost hear it saying, ‘thank you’. So does it matter if it comes from a natural well or spring in a bottle, or from a processing plant through pipes and a tap?

In the developed world, tap water is regularly and extensively tested by the water companies to ensure it is of drinkable quality. But what is ‘drinkable’? Most tap water has been recycled many times from the sewage and drainage system using chemicals (mainly chlorine). The body’s immune system, liver and kidneys recognise foreign substances and have to work hard to eliminate them. Chemicals can leave an aftertaste, but what is far more worrying are the medicines, drugs, contraceptive pills, etc. that constantly find their way into the sewage system. Some say a concentration of hormones in the water is leading to a ‘feminisation’ of the male population! Moreover, boiling the water kills germs but doesn’t remove chemicals. Water filters can remove most toxins.

Even so, tap water is cheaper, widely available, convenient and easily transported to the point of use through pipes. There are no issues around the disposal of bottles or the carbon footprint of transporting the water from source to consumer.

Like tap water, the quality of bottled water is highly regulated in most countries. It is frequently tested both at source, the bottling plant and the point of sale to ensure there is nothing harmful in it. There are many forms – still and carbonated (artificially carbonated water is best avoided since it is more acid forming), plain and flavoured (with fruit juice, for instance). You have to be careful, though, because some commercially available brands, far from coming from a well or spring, are merely purified tap water.

Some say bottled water tastes better, and generally I concur. It often contains natural trace minerals, but probably not enough to make much difference to health. It can be purchased and carried with you when away from home (but so can tap water if a bottle is filled before you go out). But it has downsides too:

  • It is undoubtedly more expensive, and some say it is a waste of money.
  • The cost of bottling and transport in both financial and environmental terms is higher per litre than tap.
  • Glass bottles are better, but both plastic and glass bottles have to be disposed of. They can be recycled, of course; it’s good to reuse materials, but transport and recycling are energy intensive.
  • Some are stored in warehouses for long periods before sale.
  • The best water comes straight from a running spring where it absorbs the health-giving energies of the natural environment.  This is not something you can bottle.

Whether tap water or bottled water is best depends partly on where you are – I’ve lived in where the tap water is drinkable but highly chemicalised, and I’ve also drunk some unpleasant bottled spring waters.

On balance I prefer natural spring water, but overall, the benefits of being well hydrated far outweigh the differences between tap and bottled. It is better to focus on the health benefits of drinking clean, fresh water than the differences between bottled and tap, and experts agree it’s better to drink tap water than none at all.

 

©David Lawrence Preston, 21.11.2017

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Working in Nature Improves Mental Health

A study by the University of Essex for the Wildlife Trust has revealed that doing voluntary work in nature improves mental wellbeing. 95% of the 139 volunteers reported an improvement in their symptoms within six weeks. The work included shrub clearing, conservation work, tree planting and food harvesting.

The results demonstrate once again that the larger the role played by nature in our lives, the healthier we are – physically and mentally. The benefits of exercise, fresh air, sunlight and natural earth-based EMFs are so great that many doctors are now urging their patients to get out into nature as often as they can.

It seems that any system of healthcare that does not rely solely on medication and other conventional approaches can only be a good thing.

©Feeling Good All the Time, 30.10.17

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Respect yourself!

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If you could have done it better, you would have.

If you could have known better, you would have.

You learn by doing it right and you learn by getting it wrong.

Missed opportunities will come round again, only next time you’ll be ready for them.

Just because you once saw something as bad for you once doesn’t mean it would be bad for you again.

Just because something was good for you once doesn’t mean it would be good for you again.

You learn by doing. Learning by doing is how you progress.

David Lawrence Preston, 21.9.2017

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1893 piles of dog poo!!!

According to Michelle Crouch in Reader’s Digest (April 2015), the reason why dogs circle around before getting down to business is that they have an instinct to align themselves with the Earth’s magnetic field before they poo. Researcher watched 70 dogs do 1893 poos over a 2 year period to work this out.

Animals have a much greater sense of the Earth’s energies than we do. It seems we have lost these abilities as we evolved. Even so, earth energies still affect us and in some circumstances harmful energies can make us very ill. Headaches, fatigue, insomnia and depression have all been linked to energy stresses coming from the ground.

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Natural healing

Natural healing is not always a quick fix. It may involve radical change to your lifestyle and habits which take weeks or months to pay off. But good habits of eating well, drinking clean, fresh fluids, breathing pure oxygen, plenty of rest, outdoor exercise and fulfilling work, a positive attitude and connecting to healthy Earth energies always reap dividends. The modern environment is full of toxic hazards but they can be nullified by re-balancing the body’s energies and restoring natural rhythms. I’m passionate about living in harmony with the natural world; join me!

www.feelinggoodallthetime.com/new-approaches-to-healthcare-and-healing/

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