A Bioenergetic Recipe for Healthy Eating

Good nutrition is obviously vital for sustaining health, preventing disease and maintaining a positive mental and emotional state, but it cannot be viewed solely in terms of its physical and chemical composition. Food and drink has energetic and informational aspects in addition to the physical; we must get not only the right biochemical components from our food, but also vital energy.

In the modern world, few grow and harvest their own food. Much of the food sold in supermarkets is chemically adulterated and nutritionally lacking compared with the foods of yesteryear, but at least we can make wiser choices to maximise the vital energy in our diet.

Living organisms – including us – are sustained by a vital force or ‘life force’ that cannot be explained in terms of traditional physics and chemistry. To eat and drink healthily, we must know:

  1. What vital energy comes with what foodstuffs? And
  2. What foods are appropriate for you, to provide the vital energy you need, taking account of your body type and lifestyle, etc.

Cooking Methods

The way food is prepared and cooked has a huge bearing on the vital energy it delivers to the body.

There’s nothing wrong with cooking – it is often necessary to make food digestible and destroy harmful enzymes. But we should aim to cook the same way as the body cooks:

  • Lightly sautéing and steaming.
  • No deep frying, which adds loads of fat and reduces the vital energy.
  • Avoid microwaving and refrigeration if possible; they appear to destroy vital energy.
  • If you eat out, look out for the healthier options. Fast foods have little vitality. Restaurant meals in general are prepared under pressure, and may lack vitality.

A Healthy Diet

There are only a handful of rules for a bio-energetically healthy diet. One of these is to choose food that not only contains beneficial macro- and micro-nutrients, but also contains substances (mostly enzymes) for the absorption of these nutrients and the elimination of waste. These substances are found primarily in fruit and vegetables. So:

  • Choose ‘living foods’ (fresh, raw fruit and vegetables, juices etc.) rather than ‘dead’ foods (almost everything else) as much as possible.
  • Choose organic food whenever possible, preferably grown locally and freshly harvested. Growing your own food increases its vital energy.
  • Meat should be raised naturally, grazing in the open air, to avoid the phenomenon of ‘angry meat’ which comes from stressed/unhappy animals.
  • Drink plenty of fluids. Many people are functionally dehydrated. Individuals need to ingest healthy fluids equal to their body weight in kilograms divided by 30, in litres. Hence a 75 Kg person needs 2.5 litres of water, fruit juice, herbal or fruit tea etc. per day.
  • Sprouting beans multiplies the nutritional value several fold and is especially good for vegetarians.
  • Consider not only the health impact of one’s nourishment system, but also their environmental and social effects.
  • Make the largest component of your diet fresh vegetables with fruit. Choose fruit and vegetables of different colours; the secondary phytonutrients responsible for the colour are mostly highly effective antioxidants or contribute to lowering blood pressure and reducing the risk of disease.
  • Omnivores should choose the lighter sources of protein like fish and lean lamb, chicken and turkey.
  • Vegetarians should make sure they get sufficient high quality protein by including beans, lentils, quinoa and other sources in their diets.
  • Reduce saturated fatty acids. This should be a priority. Replace them with Omega 3, 6 and 9 alternatives such as in avocados, nut butter and seed oils.
  • Sugar addicts should reduce their consumption to an occasional ‘treat’ and replace sweets with fresh fruit and yogurts.
  • Avoid chemically preserved foods and foods with artificial additives (colourings, emulsifiers, sweeteners etc.) as much as possible.
  • Maximise your intake of antioxidants. Antioxidants are molecules used by the body to stop damage to the cells by free radical molecules[1]. Deep green vegetables, broccoli, red grapes, tomatoes, whole grains, all kinds of berries (especially blueberries), tea, seeds and sweet potatoes all contain high levels of antioxidants.
  • Don’t depend too much on supplements. Supplements are energetically lacking since vital energy comes from the whole food, not just a part. For example, you can take the vitamin C out of an orange, but all the other energetic components are lacking.
  • Prepare food with a harmonious, relaxed attitude. Eat slowly, bless your food and take your time!

Juicing

Juicing deserves special mention because it can have a very positive effect on health. Just one pint of juice a day can have a wondrous effect. Juicing offers up to five times the amount of enzymes, antioxidants and phytonutrients in ten minutes than you would have during a normal day of eating, without five times the calories. They can also speed up recovery from illness.

  • Juice large amounts of greens, like lettuce, watercress and spinach.
  • Fruit, beetroots and carrots generally have too much sugar, so only use them in smaller quantities (no more than ¼ to ½ the total juice content). Choose green apples rather than the sweeter varieties.
  • Give your body a wide variety of everything the earth has to offer. You have plenty to choose from – kiwi fruit, celery, carrots, parsley, watermelon and so on.

Elimination

It is important to keep the bowels clean. Waste products become toxic after a while, so keep to a routine and move the bowels regularly. A healthy diet (plenty of salads, fibre, wholegrain) assists this process.

Enjoy your food

Think about what you’re actually eating and drinking. The idea that we can pop a vitamin pill to make up for all our bad eating habits is a fallacy, so correct what you’re eating before spending lots of money on nutritional products.

Create your own form of individual nutrition, based, of course, on a sound basic knowledge of the physical, chemical, energetic and informational properties of nutrients.

If you’re not sure what you’re eating, keep a nutrition diary for seven days. At the end of the week, ask yourself what proportion of your intake is accounted for by fats, carbohydrates and proteins? What proportion is fresh fruit and vegetables? Confectionery? Wholegrains? Anti-oxidant rich foods? Etc?

And relax! You don’t need to give up all your favourite foods or make eating a chore!

© David Lawrence Preston, 18.5.2019

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[1] Free radicals are reactive molecules in the body that damage cells and contribute to disease and the effects of ageing.

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